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These Easter Eggs Beep So That Kids With Visual Impairment Can Still Hunt For Them

These Easter Eggs Beep So That Kids With Visual Impairment Can Still Hunt For Them

These eggs beep so that blind children can still take part in an Easter egg hunt.

Let’s be real here: none of us who are sighted know the kind of trials and tribulations that a blind child must go through. Everything we take for granted in this modern world, from cell phones to computers to cars, all rely on a person’s sense of sight. Take that away, and the world is a lot more challenging place.

Something even as simple as an Easter egg hunt is something that visually impaired children can’t take part in. That is, unless they have these specially-made easter eggs, courtesy of the International Association of Bomb Technicians and Investigators and the Orange County Sheriff’s Department.

We know, it’s a little odd to get fun plastic Easter eggs from these very serious sources, but are we going to complain? Heck no.

Each Easter egg is essentially an egg-shaped plastic shell that comes apart into two halves. Inside is a bunch of foam, a D-cell battery, and a small speaker and a microchip that tells it to keep periodically. This allows a visually impaired child to seek out the egg in a sort of digital Marco Polo game.

The eggs were donated to the Blind Children’s Learning Center in Santa Ana, California, and were used as part of their Easter egg hunt in Newport Dunes. Roughly 50 children with varying degrees of visual ability ranging from completely blind to perfectly sighted all took part in the annual event and sought out the beeping eggs in a field of grass.

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Kevin Fuhrmann, director of development at Blind Children’s Learning Center and speaking to the Orange County Register, said that the eggs were a wonderful invention for the children. “We don’t want our kids to be excluded from the simple joys of childhood.”

Isiah Ramirez, a 4-year-old born with optic nerve hypoplasia, used his cane to search through the grass for the beeping ovals. Once found, he picked it up and held it close to his ear.

Elizabeth Vega, Isiah’s mother, said that this is one of his son’s favorite times of year. “He’s able to interact with all the kids and all the teachers, it’s very fun for him,” she said. “He’s always happy.”

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