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Watch These Cane Toads Hitch A Ride On The Back Of A Python To Escape A Storm

An Australian man captured some amazing footage of ten cane toads hitching a ride on the back of an 11-foot python.

Australia is known around the world for the weird, wonderful, and often downright terrifying creatures you can find all over the vast country. Most locals are obviously used to them, but for tourists and visitors, coming face to face with the critters can be a scary experience. Tarantulas, various snakes, not to mention what might be lurking if you venture into the water.

One of the latest discoveries by a man living in Kununurra all the way up in North West Australia was astounding even to the most hardened of locals. Andrew Mock ventured out into his garden following some heavy rainfall to discover Monty, a python that lives on his property passing by with no fewer than ten cane toads riding on his back.

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You can check out the amazing footage for yourself above courtesy of Mr. Mock. As it turns out, there was a reason for this seemingly unnatural behavior. The previously mentioned rainfall, more than 2.5 inches of it in less than an hour, caused a nearby dam to flood. The toads, which had been nesting near the water, were forced to flee, and fast. The fastest option was to quite literally hop on Monty's back who happened to be passing by.

You'd have thought that a toad jumping on to a python wouldn't exactly be the smartest thing in the world for the former to do. However, there would have been little to no chance of Monty deciding to devour one of his new passengers. That's because cane toads are extremely poisonous. The snake knew that had he eaten one, the consequences could well have been fatal.

With that, Monty's only option was to keep pushing forward with a bunch of toads coming along for the ride. While people on Twitter have been obviously having fun with the footage, labeling Monty the outback Uber, conservation biologist Jodi Rawley posited a slightly different theory for the toads' behavior. She believes they might have been trying to mate with the snake, posting a pic of one of their kind trying to do the same with a rotting mango. Thanks for that image, Jodi.

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