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Florida Man Calls Cops After Finding Iguana In Toilet

Florida Man Calls Cops After Finding Iguana In Toilet

A Florida man called 911 emergency response after finding an iguana in his toilet last week.

Iguanas aren’t exactly the prettiest sight to see in Southern Florida, but they’re at least mostly harmless. They eat fruits, leaves, and flowers, and are generally considered a bit of a pest.

They also freeze up when it gets unseasonably cold and fall out of trees, which is pretty funny to watch.

As funny as they are, Iguanas are also somewhat curious as far as reptiles go, and they sometimes get themselves into places where they shouldn’t be. Like, for instance, inside a home’s bathroom, which is exactly where one Fort Lauderdale resident found a green iguana when he was just looking to use the facilities.

On March 14, Fort Lauderdale emergency dispatch got a somewhat unusual call from a disgruntled man complaining that there was a massive iguana in his toilet. Unable to extricate the lizard himself, the man called the Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission initially but was told that the Commission doesn’t respond to those sorts of calls.

So he dialed 911.

“He came home for lunch, freaked out and didn’t know what to do,” Fort Lauderdale Fire Rescue Battalion Chief Stephan Gollan told the Miami Herald.

RELATED: MORE THAN 1,400 IGUANAS REINTRODUCED TO THE GALAPAGOS ISLANDS

Once the snickering had died down, emergency services dispatched the fire crew of Engine 13 to the man’s house. Firefighter Jeff Kurus donned rubber gloves and managed to grab the slippery lizard and release it outside where it belongs, but not before getting a few hilarious pictures first.

Why would a lizard seek shelter in a toilet bowl? Iguanas are a semi-aquatic species that prefer to be near bodies of water. They use their powerful tails to swim and some species can hold their breath underwater for up to 15 minutes.

Apparently, South Florida emergency dispatch is no stranger to the old “toilet iguana” call. In 2017, a similar situation occurred in West Kendall where Miami-Dade’s Fire Rescue Venom One unit responded to a call regarding a toilet iguana. Iguanas are not venomous, so sending the Venom One unit was a little bit overkill.

NEXT: 10 IGUANA FACTS AND 5 BUSTED MYTHS

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