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Artist Destroys Original Statue That Inspired The Momo Suicide Game

Artist Destroys Original Statue That Inspired The Momo Suicide Game

The artist that created the original statue that became wrapped up in the Momo Suicide Game has destroyed his work.

Last summer, you might have heard of a weird new thing that was popping up. Part urban legend, part social media sensation, it was called the Momo Challenge -also known as the Momo Suicide Game.

In the game, someone presenting themselves as “Momo” would text a random number on a messenger service, such as Whatsapp, and ask if the recipient would like to play a game. If you’re getting some Saw film vibes, that’s the whole point. Along with the request to add the user to their contact list, Momo would also send a somewhat disturbing image of a bird-like woman to the other person’s phone.

The game itself would start out as Momo merely asking the person to perform random or silly acts, but would later become darker and more violent. If the player refuses a request, disturbing imagery is then sent until the player blocks the number.

Later it evolved into an online phenomenon where disturbing “Momo” imagery would be spliced into innocent videos of kids playing Fortnite or a cartoon such as Peppa Pig. Momo would appear and start speaking in a creepy computerized voice, threatening to kill or harm the watcher.

Momo is still going on, so parents should be sure to keep an eye on what their kids watch online or who they speak to via messenger services. But in the meantime, the original artist who created the Momo statue has declared that “the curse is gone” after having destroyed it.

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via: Times of India

Artist Keisuke Aiso debuted the statue, which is actually called “Mother Bird”, back in 2016 at the Tokyo Art Show. Based on the Japanese legend of an “Ubume,” which is essentially the creepy ghost of a mother who died during childbirth, “Mother Bird” featured a large, beak-like mouth and wide, bulbous eyes, and talons instead of hands.

Although Aiso intended the statue to be scary, he never intended it to start an internet phenomenon that threatens to harm children. He says that he hadn’t maintained the statue since creating it in 2016 and that it was “falling apart.”

"If you’d have seen it in the state it was in, it would have probably looked even more terrifying,” Aiso told The Sun in an interview.

While the statue was destroyed last Autumn, the Momo Challenge itself continues on YouTube and social media.

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